Monday, November 22, 2010

Ban Dihydrogen Monoxide.



Been watching some Penn & Teller again and notice some more on You Tube that I haven't seen before. But I still love this one.

4 comments:

Ryan said...

I remember hearing about this some time ago and being sadly unsurprised. Its forgiveable that people may not realise the nomenclature but being roped in by someone without asking simple questions like "what is it? what are its benefits? why is it being put in pesticides/food etc? why does it increase urination?" is ridiculous.

Neal Asher said...

As they said, it was all presented in enviro-speak. These people are plonkers and I thoroughly agree with Patrick Moore's opinion of them (founder member of Green Peace). It completely ceased to be about the environment after 1989.

Neal Asher said...

Of course it wasn't all about the environment prior to 1989:

"After six years as one of five directors of Greenpeace International, I observed that none of my fellow directors had any formal science education. They were either political activists or environmental entrepreneurs. Ultimately, a trend toward abandoning scientific objectivity in favor of political agendas forced me to leave Greenpeace in 1986. The breaking point was a Greenpeace decision to support a world-wide ban on chlorine. Science shows that adding chlorine to drinking water was the biggest advance in the history of public health, virtually eradicating water-borne diseases such as cholera. And the majority of our pharmaceuticals are based on chlorine chemistry. Simply put, chlorine is essential for our health. My former colleagues ignored science and supported the ban, forcing my departure. Despite science concluding no known health risks – and ample benefits – from chlorine in drinking water, Greenpeace and other environmental groups have opposed its use for more than 20 years."
-- Patrick Moore.

Ryan said...

Scientific apathy is unfortunately rampant. You only have to look on TV for programs like "Dr" Gillian McKieth or skim youtube for any variety of videos about creationism, flatearthism, raw food movement, alternative medicine movement etc.

I think one unfortunate side effect of the internet is that anyone with a crazy idea can broadcast it. The average person has no way to distinguish between science and pseudoscience. Considering how dangerous that is its a wonder that countering pseudoscience and increasing scientific education arent government priorities.

On another note there was a water banning movement at my university. They wanted to ban all bottled water because it was "bad for the environment when it comes from a tap" and "it encouraged damaging consumerism". They wanted more water fountains instead which was ironic because water for them was supplied by the Powwow group which is owned by Neslte which was also banned...