Sunday, March 06, 2011

The Culture Show on BBC2.

This, over on Disco Stu's blog made me chuckle. I'm always one for trying to see what's on the shelves to the rear of shots on TV, or I study those shelves in pictures in magazines. Unfortunately I missed this one.


Incidentally, besides 1984, has anyone seen any sign of science fiction books being dicussed on TV during this purported year of books?

9 comments:

Mark T Croucher said...

Outcasts, lol.

Neal Asher said...

I meant SF books. I'll change it.

SFcrowsnest said...

If, as individual viewers based in the UK, you want to complain to the BBC about failing to cover a single fantasy, horror or science fiction novel during World Book Night, the online form to do this is located at... https://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/forms/ ... the more complaints, the better!

SFcrowsnest said...

The details for the form are: The Books We Really Read: a Culture Show Special. It went out on BBC2 on the 5th March 2011.

vaudeviewgalor raandisisraisins said...

tits up! you can spot ASHER from about 4 a.u. away.
what other books are on that shelf? anything good?

hint: usually it's a pile of Iain Banks books nesting around the big ashes.

Disco Stu said...

Nope - not a jot of scifi.

Tons of chicklit though.

sean collins said...

I enjoyed the programme, but bet myself that it wouldn't get a mention. In fairness, it was stated (in line with the programme's title) that they were looking at the biggest selling genres; but as an SF fan, a) some sort of mention would have been nice &, b) where does SF genre fit in the sales hierarchy?

man-of-inaction said...

it's the usual, the talking heads in the mediaverse don't really consider sci-fi as a genre of literature. So they're happy to discuss chick-lit and vampire tomes but nothing which requires an imaginative leap.

Neal Asher said...

SFcrowsnest, I would complain to the BBC about this but the corporation just doesn't live in the same reality as the rest of the country. Their SF TV is a case in point. They make a desultory attempt at it because they think they ought to, but don't really care all that much since they exist through a tax, rather than in commercial reality.